CHAMPIONS OF THE WILD, SeaWorld Surpasses 28,000 Rescues


May 1, 2016

SeaWorld has surpassed 28,000 rescues...but we won’t stop there!

 

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Unprecedented unusual mortality events (UMEs) in the years leading up to and in 2015 helped push the SeaWorld rescue count to over 27,000 rescues of ill, injured and orphaned animals over 50 years. Unfortunately, that number is still on the rise.

 

In 2016 alone the SeaWorld has rescued 857 animals including two cetaceans, eight manatees, and 373 pinnipeds (sea lions and seals).

 

Plus, over the last 12 months SeaWorld Rescue was called to assist in an unusual number of entanglement, including that of a juvenile humpback whale off the coast of California. It is believed that this increase in entanglements may be caused by warming ocean waters which brings whales closer to shore where they’re more likely to encounter fishing gear

 

Also thought to be a consequence of warming ocean waters, SeaWorld continues to experience a high number of sea lion strandings. As water temperatures increase food sources are being pushed farther away leaving sea lion pups starving. On a constant search for food, these sea lion pups find themselves in some interesting places which lead to some pretty memorable rescues. One of the most memorable this year was that of Marina, an emaciated sea lion pup who was discovered sleeping in a booth at a local San Diego Restaurant. Marina’s story has a happy ending as she was recently returned to back to the ocean.

 

Most recently, SeaWorld Rescue came to the aid of three manatees in need. A mother presumed to have been involved in a boat strike and her calf, and an orphaned manatee discovered by Satellite beach. These three manatees are currently in the expert care of the SeaWorld Orlando veterinarian team and are already showing signs of improvement.

 

The SeaWorld Rescue team is on call 24/7/365 and works tirelessly to protect any animal in need.

SeaWorld’s legacy of animal rescue spans more than 50 years and has now benefited more than 28,000 animals. Working in partnership with state, local, and federal agencies, we help animals that are orphaned, ill, injured or in need of expert care.

Learn more about the SeaWorld Rescue Team by visiting SeaWorldCares.com

Join the SeaWorld Action Team


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